All posts filed under: History

History of the Caliphs: Umar ibn al-Khattab

The Messenger of Allah ﷺ said: “If there was to be a Prophet after me, it would have been Umar bin Al-Khattab.” [1] 1- Caliphate Term of office start Hijri 22 Jumādā al-Ūlā, 13 Term of office end Hijri 26 Dhul-Hijjah, 23 Term of office start Gregorian 23 August, 634 Term of office end Gregorian 3 November, 644 Term of office 10 years Capital Medina Caliph’s allowance 6000 dirhams[2] 2- Biography Profile An elder statesman and right-hand man of the Prophet ﷺ. The shayateen used to run away from Umar, and he was the strong door holding back the fitna from the people. Period of the Caliphate Rightly Guided Caliphate Age 48 Tribe Quraysh (Banu ‘Adiy) Mandatory condition of Caliph: Strength of ideology Ashratul-Mubashireen (10 promised Jannah) Umar was nicknamed al-Farooq (the criterion) because he showed Islam openly in Makkah and through him Allah distinguished (farraqa) between disbelief and faith.[3] Mandatory condition of Caliph: Capability to rule Ruling experience gained during Islamic State of the Prophet ﷺ: ·         Wazir (Highest government post after Caliph) ·         …

The Khilafah and the Indian Subcontinent

BY ABU ISMAEL AL-BEIRAWI This article has been reproduced from Islamic Revival. After yet another anniversary of the abolishment of the Khilafah state it is important for us to reflect upon its history and the reaction of the Muslims towards its demise and eventual destruction. It is assumed by some that the Muslims and their scholars did not react to the call for the abolishment of Khilafah and that they did not realise its significance. This is untrue, history is a testament to the reaction of the Muslims, their struggle to maintain it and their pain at the eventual removal of the shade of Allah (swt) from the earth. The example of the Muslims of India and its renowned Khilafat Movement demonstrates this.

Ottoman Bosnia

Introduction The Ottoman Sultanate which later became the seat of the Caliphate in 1517 was by no means perfect. A decline in Islamic thought, weakness in the Arabic language and closing the doors of ijtihad all had an impact on the implementation of Islam across the state. Yet despite this, the Ottoman State remained an Islamic State, and its concepts, criteria and convictions were Islamic. Legislation and administrative laws (kanun) were based on sharia, even if this was a tenuous link in some cases due to the decline in ijtihad, such as the devshirme, hereditary bay’a and tanzimat reforms.